8 Life Predictions for 2023.

Written by: Vasantha

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The term "vibes" represented our fuzzy sense of discomfort in the early days of the pandemic. In a now-deleted viral tweet, my friend Steve Macfarlane, who works in the film department at the Museum of Modern Art, caught the essence of summer 2021.

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No more ‘vibes’

Last month, designer Marco Simonetti shared photographs of a possible Jacquemus and Nike pop-up shop in the French ski resort of Courchevel.

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Comfort in the soft

He has created a job in the mayor's office for a rodent mitigation director. (Starting salary: $120,000.) He has hired a sanitation commissioner, who, at a press conference this fall, reiterated his rhetoric, reminding vermin that "the rats don't run this city, we do."

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Pet rat

They've had a successful run. Conversely, the popularity of 2022 slip-ons predicts that shoelaces may be phased out by 2023. We've already worn TikTok Birkenstock Boston clogs and UGG slippers to work, as well as loafers, ballerina flats, and Mary Janes.

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The end of shoelace

Last year, the TikTok fad of "butter boards" — gussied-up butter, melted and spread over a cutting board, sprinkled with garnishes such as herbs, edible flowers, salt, or honey — took the internet by storm.

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Butter crock

The years 2016 to 2022 were distinguished by a high level of disorder, with the pandemic serving as the pinnacle of four years of incomprehensible yelling.

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Revenge of the normie

As inflation erodes our purchasing power and fast fashion becomes increasingly monotonous and ethically dubious, we may expect to hear a lot about buying stylish "investment pieces" in 2023. But, for those of us who can't afford or don't want to invest in a $1,300 black turtleneck from The Row, I'm hoping for a resurrection of do-it-yourself apparel creation this year.

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Crafty skill

TikTok aided in ushering in a new era of fashion forgery. Fake fast-fashion websites Bottega Venetas and Balenciagas aided in the popularity of "dupe" accessories, but traditional New York City street merchants gained as well, such as the "scarf guy" on Manhattan's Seventh Avenue selling Acne Studios knockoffs. Given the cyclical nature of the fashion industry, it is predicted that in 2023

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Fake fashion item